catceleste:

hey can someone send me some recs for novel-length fics that are specific to my stringent tastes and are completed with an ending i approve of

So this spiral, this is the golden ratio and it’s a mathematical pattern that just repeats itself in nature, in flower petals and honeybees and, you know, the stars in the galaxy and in every molecule of our DNA. God, we’re so different, all of us.

televisiongif:

  At least Eliot gave me a hug.

Passage - Roberto Bolle & Polina Semionova

“I like her. She makes life interesting. She, herself, is interesting, I suppose. She talks right from the heart. I appreciate her frankness and I like the fact that she doesn’t force the natural flow of a conversation. There’s personality in her words. She thus gets to the core of things and that’s important because with her — I can talk knowing that the talk is real! Oh believe me, it’s amazingly real! And she also gives me the opportunity to listen as fully and completely as possible. And I can’t seem to get her out of my head […]”

Virginia Woolf, from Selected Letters  (via pre-raphaelites) —

billiesholiday:

Billie Holiday in 1958, Herman Leonard.

ohrobbybaby:

Ginger Rogers in “Vivacious Lady” (1938)

Title: Little Whiskey
Artist: Angus & Julia Stone
Played: 1292 times

pour a little whiskey before I head home

poor, poor love sick child


“Do you know why teachers use me? Because I speak in tongues. I write metaphors. Every one of my stories is a metaphor you can remember. The great religions are all metaphor. We appreciate things like Daniel and the lion’s den, and the Tower of Babel. People remember these metaphors because they are so vivid you can’t get free of them and that’s what kids like in school. They read about rocket ships and encounters in space, tales of dinosaurs. All my life I’ve been running through the fields and picking up bright objects. I turn one over and say, Yeah, there’s a story.”

Friday would have been Ray Bradbury’s 94th birthday, which is why Dan Piepenbring, at The Paris Review Dailylooked back on one of Bradbury’s classic stories and picked out some choice quotes from his Art of Fiction interview. Piepenbring also pointed out that the story gets a mention in, among other places, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao. You could supplement this by reading Tanjil Rashid on the author’s Middle East connection. (via millionsmillions) —